Huffines Institute - Articles

Archive by tag: diseaseReturn
RSS
"Unpacking" Muscles

"Unpacking" Muscles

  • 4/8/2018 7:00:00 AM
  • View Count 54
Jessica Cardin, M.S.Skeletal muscle has a high degree of plasticity that allows the tissue to respond to environmental cues (exercise, disuse, starvation, etc.). The majority of research has focused on the building of muscle. However, atrophy has vast implications across many disease states (cancer cachexia, renal failure, COPD, and Type II Diabetes). The understanding of how atrophy occurs as an "unpacking" process of the muscle fiber is limited. Pioneering research is important as it...
Read More
More Homework Doesn't Make You Smarter

More Homework Doesn't Make You Smarter

  • 4/2/2018 6:30:00 AM
  • View Count 94
Yiyu Wang, M.S.In the real world, students are required to be competitive to face more challenges in the future as tension increases in energy, finance, territory and human resource. The huge amount of homework is assigned to students in order to help students achieve their goal and face a challenging future. Traditionally, teachers and parents believe that study achievement is equal to time spent in homework or assignments. People often overlook the function of physical...
Read More
Are MicroRNA's the Connection Between Exercise and Breast Cancer?

Are MicroRNA's the Connection Between Exercise and Breast Cancer?

  • 3/5/2018 6:30:00 AM
  • View Count 183
Chelsea Goodenough, HBScBreast cancer is the most common type of cancer that kills women world-wide [1]. Emerging out from under the emotional and financial burden of this disease is the united front of patients, families and researchers alike seeking to understand the complexity of this disease. With exercise's noted benefit to a 30-40% reduction in breast cancer risk, investigation into mechanisms that may be attributing to these findings have unveiled a frontrunner - microRNA. MicroRNA ar...
Read More
Degenerative Brain Disease in Contact-Sport Athletes—Scientists Hit Back

Degenerative Brain Disease in Contact-Sport Athletes—Scientists Hit Back

  • 12/9/2016 2:20:00 AM
  • View Count 783
Christina Bennett, M.S.You have probably seen the headlines touting the latest football player to be diagnosed with the rare degenerative brain disease called chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE was first diagnosed in NFL football player Mike Webster in 2002 and has continued to grab the public’s attention.Experts believe that repeated hits to the head are the cause of CTE. These brain injury events include both those labeled as concussions and brain injuries less severe. People at...
Read More
Think BIG, Start SMALL: MicroRNAs and Breast Cancer

Think BIG, Start SMALL: MicroRNAs and Breast Cancer

  • 12/4/2016 5:22:00 PM
  • View Count 1579
Chelsea Goodenough, B.S.The human body is capable of powerful things. When in prime condition, we are capable of adrenaline induced She-Hulk strength, and fighting the effect of zero gravity by walking on the moon. This, to most of us, is recognizable as disease, and is amongst us in the form of diabetes, heart disease, obesity, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) to name only a few. A disease that affects nearly 246,660 new people every year, is breast cancer, with an estimated 40,...
Read More
Extinguishing The Flame Of Inflammation

Extinguishing The Flame Of Inflammation

  • 9/30/2016 2:03:00 AM
  • View Count 444
Corrine Metzger, M.S.An uncontained fire can quickly spread and wreak havoc on areas both near and far to the instigating source. Under the right conditions, one flame can set a whole forest on fire and soon spread beyond its confines. In a similar way, inflammation can start at a local region in the body, but the damaging effects can spread to distant sites. One example of far spread damage of inflammation is the bone loss concurrent with inflammatory bowel disease. Inflammatory bowel disease (...
Read More
Your Blood Vessels: Essential to Healthy Aging

Your Blood Vessels: Essential to Healthy Aging

  • 6/18/2014 6:11:00 AM
  • View Count 1215
Meredith Luttrell, Ph.DWe seldom think about physical effects of aging until that first wrinkle appears. While it’s easy to associate aging with changes in appearance, changes that occur within the body, such as impaired blood vessel function, are more likely to affect the quality of life even more. Cardiovascular disease affects 1 in 3 Americans, according to the Centers for Disease Control, and the risk of developing it increases with age. The term cardiovascular disease (CVD) encompasse...
Read More
Destined for Heart Disease?-NO Way!

Destined for Heart Disease?-NO Way!

  • 2/20/2013 6:09:00 AM
  • View Count 1338
John Seawright, B.S.Heart disease is a cruel ailment that befalls many Americans. It is a life threatening disease that does not strike only a single individual; the suffering proliferates through the patient’s entire family. Understanding the causes of heart disease can elucidate avenues of treatment, as well as provide pre-emptive strategies to prevent the disease in the first place.      Heart disease is a complex malady resulting from a poorly functioning ...
Read More
Exercise - Take Once Daily for Better Bone Health

Exercise - Take Once Daily for Better Bone Health

  • 8/13/2012 11:10:00 AM
  • View Count 1468
Ramon Boudreaux, M.S.It is often joked that if exercise could be given as a pill it would be the most prescribed drug in the world.  While some benefits of exercise are well known (e.g., the prevention of heart disease, high blood pressure, and obesity), some remain esoteric. Osteoporosis, a condition in which bones lose density by an increase in porosity, is one such example.  Low density bones are at a much higher risk of fracture.  If one were to compare the architecture of a b...
Read More
Sclerostin: Bad to the Bone?

Sclerostin: Bad to the Bone?

  • 7/23/2012 10:05:00 AM
  • View Count 2856
Brandon Macias, Ph.DMost folks, especially those who do not suffer from bone debilitating diseases, might forget that their skeletons are “alive.”  Yes, the bone that protects your vital organs and works with your muscles to get you out of bed in the morning is constantly remodeling.  Bone cells called osteoblasts lay down new bone matrix, and bone cells called osteoclasts, “eat” or resorb bone tissue.  In a normal healthy human, this bone-forming activity ...
Read More
Page 1 of 2 FirstPrevious [1]2 Last

Search



Archive



Ready to Get Our Mobile App For iOS / Android?